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Cuisine Of Burma

Cuisine Of Burma


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Home Page > Business > Team Building > Cuisine Of Burma

Cuisine Of Burma

Posted: Oct 08, 2010 |Comments: 0
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List of Notable dishes

Mohinga, the national dish of Burma

Because a standardized system of romanisation for spoken Burmese does not exist, pronunciations of the following dishes in modern standard Burmese approximated using IPA are provided.

Lahpet, a popular delicacy

Bazun thohk (Burmese: ; IPA: [bzun ou]), pickled prawn salad

Jin thohk ( [din ou]), ginger salad with sesame seeds

Khao sw thohk ( [kausw ou]), wheat noodle salad with dried shrimps, shredded cabbage and carrots, dressed with fried peanut oil, fish sauce and lime

Htamin thohk ( [tamin ou]), rice salad with tomato puree, potato,glass noodle, toasted chickpea flour, crushed toasted dried fermented beancake,crushed dried shrimp, crushed dried chilli, garlic and dressed with cooked peanut oil, fish sauce, lime or tamarind and coriander

Hto-mohnt ( [toumoun]), glutinous rice cake with raisins, cashews and coconut shavings

Katkyi-hnyat ( [kadi], lit. ‘cut with scissors’), a southern coastal dish (from the Dawei area) of rice noodles with a variety of seafood, land meats, raw bean sprouts, beans and fried eggs comparable to pad thai

Jaryoh hinga ( [tajou hina]), lotus roots in clear chicken or fish broth

Jarzan hin, ( [dazan hin]) glass noodle soup with chicken, wood-ear mushrooms, dried flowers, onions, boiled egg, garnished with coriander, thin-sliced onions, crushed dried chilli and a dash of lime (Mandalay)

Jarzan hinga ( [dazan hina]), glass noodle soup with dried shrimp, wood-ear mushrooms, egg, dried flowers, onions (Yangon)

Jauk-kyaw ( [taotau]), agar jelly usually set in two layers with coconut milk

Jay-oh ( [teiou]), vermicelli noodles in soup with pork offal and greens

Let thohk sohn ( [le ousoun]), similar to htamin thohk with shredded green papaya, shredded carrot, ogonori sea moss and often wheat noodles

Mohinga ( [mounhina]), the unofficial national dish of rice vermicelli in fish broth with onions, garlic, ginger, lemon grass and sliced tender core of banana-stem, served with boiled eggs, fried fish cake (nga hpe) and fritters (akyaw)

Shwe yin aye is a popular and refreshing dessert

Montletsaung (Burmese: [mounlesaun]), tapioca balls, glutinous rice, grated coconut and toasted sesame with jaggery syrup in coconut milk

Nanjee thohk (Burmese: [nandi ou]) or Mont di, thick rice noodle salad with chickpea flour, chicken, fish cake (nga hpe), onions, coriander, spring onions, crushed dried chilli, dressed with fried crispy onion oil, fish sauce and lime

Nanbyajee thohk (), as above with tagliatelle

Ngapi jet ( [api d]), fermented spicy fish paste or salted fish curried with onions, tomatoes, garlic, chilli and coriander served with to za ya, vegetables fresh or boiled, on the side

Ngapi jaw ( [api tau]), fried version with dried shrimp, onions, garlic and dried chilli

Ohn-no khao sw ( [ounnou kausw]), curried chicken and wheat noodles in a coconut milk broth similar to Malaysian laksa and Chiang Mai’s khao soi

Sanwin makin ( [sanwin makin]), semolina cake with raisins, walnuts and poppy seeds

Shwe gyi mohnt ( [wei di moun]), hardened semolina (wheat) porridge with poppy seeds

Shwe yin aye ( [wei jin ei]), agar jelly, tapioca and sago in coconut milk

Shauk thee thohk, sliced lemon or kaffir lime (no pith or rind), toasted chickpea flour, crushed roasted peanut, crushed dried shrimp, crushed dried chilli, baked fish paste, cooked oil with onions (goes very well and often served with kya zan hinga)

Chinese-inspired

Mandalay Meeshay

Asayn jaw, cabbage, cauliflower, carrot, green beans, baby corn, cornflour or tapioca starch, tomatoes, squid sauce

Bghin ( [be kin]), roasted duck

Dim sum, meat/fish/prawn/crab/sausage/egg/sea weeds, flour, flavor enhancer

Hpet htohk (lit. leaf wrap), meat, pastry paper, ginger, garlic, pepper powder, salt. Usually served with soup or with noodles.

Htamin jaw ( [ta min tau]), fried rice with boiled peas (p byouk),the poor man’s favourite breakfast

Kawyei khao sw ( [k ji kau sw]), noodles and curried duck (or pork) in broth with eggs.

La mohnt ( [la moun]), (mooncake), an oily disk-shaped cake filled with either sugar or sweet bean paste

Mi swun ( [mi swan]),very soft rice noodles, known as Mee suah in Singapore and Malaysia. It is a popular option for invalids, usually with chicken broth.

Panthay khao sw ( [panei kau sw]), halal noodles with chicken and spices, often served by the Muslim Panthay Chinese.

Pao-see ( [pau si]), steamed buns filled with either pork and egg or sweet bean paste

San byohk ( [san pjou]), (rice congee) with fish, chicken or duck often fed to invalids.

Seejet khao sw ( [si t kau sw]), wheat noodles with duck or pork, fried garlic oil, soy sauce and chopped spring onions. It is considered an ‘identity dish’ of Myanmar and Burmese Chinese, as it is not available in other Chinese cuisines. Sarawak’s Kolok mee is a bit similar.

Wet-tha doh-to, pork offal cooked in light soy sauce. Eaten with raw ginger and chilli sauce.

Indian-inspired

Fried chapatti with p-byohk – a Mandalay favourite

Samosa salad in Mandalay

Danbauk ( [dan pau]), Burmese-style biryani with either chicken or mutton served with mango pickle, fresh mint and green chili

Fried chapatti, crispy and blistered, with boiled peas (p-byohk), a popular breakfast next to nan bya

Halawa, a snack made of sticky rice, butter, coconut milk, from Indian dessert halwa. In Burma Halwa is referred to a loose form, something like smashed potato, without baking into a hard or firmer cake in contrast to Sa-Nwin-Ma-Kin.

Hpaluda, similar to the Indian dessert falooda, rose water, milk, jello, coconut jelly, coconut shavings, sometimes served with custard and ice cream

Htat taya ([ta t ja]), lit. “a hundred layers”, fried flaky multilayered paratha with either a sprinkle of sugar or p byouk

Htawbat htamin, rice made with butter and mostly eaten with chicken curry.

Kyit Sara, Semolina chicken or meat paste

Chicken or meat is boiled or cooked and removed all the bones and skin. It is then mixed with Semolina and dhal. Nowadays the mixture is easily put into the grinder and grinded. But originally it was put in the big pot, stirred and pounded using a big ladle with a rounded lower edge. Once it turns into a thick paste it is sprinkled with cinnamon powder and deep-fried onion. Not only it is tasty but it is highly nutritious and easily digestible.

Malaing lohn ( [m lain loun]), Burmese-style gulab jamun

Nan bya ( [nan bja]), Burmese style naan buttered or with p byouk, also with mutton soup

Palata ( [p la a]), Burmese style paratha with egg or mutton

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Samusa ( [sa mu sa]), Burmese-style samosa with mutton and onions served with fresh mint, green chilli,onions and lime

Samusa thohk ( [sa mu sa ou]), samosa salad with onions, cabbage, fresh mint, potato curry, masala, chili powder, salt and lime

Sa-Nwin-Ma-Kin or Burmese Semolina Cake or Semolina Pudding or (Kuih) Sooji, using Sooji (Semolina), eggs, cream of wheat (Semolina), coconut cream, sugar, raisins and milk. It is topped with sesame seeds and baked with the charcoal slow fire above and below to made them like brownie golden cakes.

Shai Mai or Sa Wai or sayviah/ sweet vermicelli served with fried cashews, coconut shreds, raisins with milk

Theezohn chinyay, lit. vegetable all- sorts sour broth, with drumstick, lady’s finger, egg plant, green beans, potato, onions, ginger, dried chilli, boiled egg, dried salted fish, fish paste and tamarind

Shan-inspired

Shan khao sw with tohpu jaw, with monnyinjin on the side

Shan inspired – Nangyi Thohk

Htamin jin ( [ta min tin]), a rice, tomato and potato or fish salad kneaded into round balls dressed and garnished with crisp fried onion in oil, tamarind sauce, coriander and spring onions often with garlic, Chinese chives roots (ju myit), fried whole dried chili, grilled dried fermented beancakes (p bouk} and fried dried topu (topu jauk kyaw) on the side

Lahpet thohk () [le pe ou]), a salad of pickled tea leaves with fried peas, peanuts and garlic, toasted sesame, fresh garlic, tomato, green chili, crushed dried shrimps, preserved ginger and dressed with peanut oil, fish sauce and lime

Meeshay, ( [mi ei]), rice noodles with pork and/or chicken, bean sprouts, rice flour gel, rice flour fritters, dressed with soy sauce, salted soybean, rice vinegar, fried peanut oil, chilli oil, and garnished with crispfried onions, crushed garlic, coriander, and pickled daikon/mustard greens

Papaya salad ( [in bau i ou])

Shan tohu ( [an tou hu]), a type of tofu made from chickpea flour or yellow split pea eaten as fritters (tohpu jaw) or in a salad (tohpu thohk), also eaten hot before it sets as tohu byawk aka tohu nway and as fried dried tohpu (tohu jauk kyaw)

Shan khao sw ( [an kausw]), rice noodles with chicken or minced pork, onions, garlic, tomatoes, chili, crushed roasted peanuts, young vine of mangetout, served with tohu jaw or tohu nway and pickled mustard greens (monnyinjin)

Wet thachin ( [w a tin]), preserved minced pork in rice

Wet tha hmyit chin ( [w a mji tin]), pork with sour bamboo shoots

Mon-inspired

Mon banana pudding

Thingyan Rice () – fully boiled rice in candle-smelt water served with mango salad.

Htamane () dessert made from glutinous rice, shredded coconuts and peanuts

Banana pudding dessert made from banana boiled in coconut milk and sugar.

Wet mohinga like mohinga but vermicelli is served while wet

Durian jam also known as Katut jam

Nga baung thohk () Mixed vegetables and prawn, wrapped in morinda leaves and then banana leaves outside.

Sanwinmakin () dessert cake made from semolina, sugar, butter, coconut.

Rakhine-inspired

Monte-de – an extremely popular and economical fast food dish where rice vermicelli are either eaten with some condiments and soup prepared from nga-pi, or as a salad with powdered fish and some condiments. The American Conger, Conger oceanicus, called Nga-shwe in Arakanese and Burmese, is the fish of choice.

Jar-zun thohk – glass vermicelli salad with boiled prawn julien and mashed curried duck eggs and potatoes.

Ngapi Daung – an extremely spicy condiment made from pounded ngapi and green chili

Khayun thee nga chauk chet – Brinjal cooked lightly with a small amount of oil, with dried fish and chilli

Ngha-pyaw-thi-bohn – bananas stewed in milk and coconut, and garnished with black sesame. Eaten either as a dish during meals, or as a dessert.

Saw-hlaing Monte – a baked sweet, made from millet, raisins, coconut and butter

Sut-hnan – millet cooked in sweet milk with raisins

Starches

The most common starch (staple food) in Myanmar is white rice. Glutinous rice called kauk hnyin is also very popular including the purple variety known as nga cheik especially as a breakfast dish. Various types of noodles are commonly used in salads and soups or fried. Vermicelli noodles and rice noodles are often used in soups, while thick rice and wheat noodles are used in salads. Palata, a flaky fried flatbread is often eaten with curried meats while nan-bya, a baked flatbread is eaten with any Indian dishes. Another favourite is aloo poori – puffed-up fried breads eaten with potato curry.

Ingredients

Main article: List of Ingredients in Burmese cuisine

Ingredients used in Burmese dishes are often fresh. Many fruits are used in conjunction with vegetables in many dishes. The Burmese eat a great variety of vegetables and fruits, and all kinds of meat.

A very popular vegetable is the danyin thi, which is usually boiled or roasted and dipped in salt, oil and sometimes, cooked coconut fat.

Ngapi

Ngapi is considered the corner stone of any Burmese meal or dish. It is used in a versatile manner in that it is used in soup base, in salad, in main dishes and also in condiments. Popular varieties depend on the region,such as in Rakhine State, Shan State, Ayeyarwady Division and Tanintharyi Division.

The Ngapi of Rakhine State contains no or lesser salt, and uses marine fish. It is used as a soup base for the Rakhine ‘national’ cuisine, Mont-de. It is also used widely in cooking both vegetables, fish and even meat.

In the coastal Ayeyarwady and Tanintharyi divisions, the majority of ngapi is instead based on fresh water fish, with a lot of salt. The ngapi is also used as a condiment such as ngapi-yay (an essential part of Karen cuisine, which includes runny ngapi, spices and boiled fresh vegetables). In Shan State, ngapi is made instead from fermented beans, and is used as both a flavoring and also condiment in Shan cuisine.

Condiments

Burmese cuisine is full of condiments, from sweet, sour to savory. The most popular are pickled mango, balachaung (shrimp and ngapi floss) and ngapi gyaw (fried ngapi in various manners) and vegetables preserved in rice wine (from Shan State). Ngapi plays a major part in condiments, as a dip for fresh vegetables.

Bean ngapi from the Shan states plays a major role in Shan cuisine. Dried bean ngapi chips are used as condiments for various shan dishes.

Fruits

Myanmar has a wide range of fruits, and most are of tropical origin. However, some notable Western fruits such as strawberries are also popular. Durian, guava and others are commonly served as desserts. Other fruits include mango, banana, jackfruit, plum, lychee, papaya, pomelo, water melon, pomegranate, mangosteen, sugar-apple and rambutan.

Eating customs

A typical Burmese meal

Traditionally, Burmese eat their meals with dishes on a low table, while sitting on a bamboo mat, and dishes are served more or less at the same time. A typical meal would include steaming hot rice as the staple, a curried freshwater fish or dried/salted fish dish, if affordable a curried meat or poultry dish instead, soup (hinjo) which if sour is called chinyay, and fresh or boiled vegetables to go with a salty dish almost invariably a curried sauce of pickled fish (ngapi yayjo) in Lower Burma. Fritters such as gourd or onions in batter as well as fish or dried tohpu crackers are extra.

Out of respect, the eldest diners are always served first before the rest join in; even when the elders are absent, the first morsel of rice from the pot is scooped and put aside as an act of respect to one’s parents, a custom known as oo tcha (lit. first serve). Burmese people eat with their right hand, forming the rice into a small ball with only the fingertips and mixing this with various morsels before popping it into their mouths. Chopsticks and a Chinese style spoon are used for noodle dishes, although noodle salads are more likely to be eaten with just a spoon. Knives and forks are used rarely in homes but will always be provided for guests and are available in restaurants and hotels. Drinks are not often served with the meal and, instead, the usual liquid accompaniment is in the form of a light broth or consomme served from a communal bowl. Outside of the meal, the Burmese beverage of choice is light green tea (yay nway jan; [jei nwei dun]).

Influences

The countries that border Myanmar, especially India, China and Thailand – have influenced Burmese cuisine. Indian influences are found in Burmese versions of dishes such as samosas and biryani, and Indian curries, spices and breads such as nan (naan) and palata (paratha). Ethnic Indians have a monopoly on such dishes. Chinese influence in Burmese cuisine is shown in the use of ingredients like bean curd and soya sauce, various noodles as well as in stir-frying techniques. Fried insects are eaten as snacks as in neighbouring Thailand and Laos.

Gallery

Mohn la jin – pickled daikon or mooli

Cha-om omelette – a popular dish with ladies

Bu nyunt hinjo – young vine of gourd clear soup

Dunt dalun chin-yei – drumstick sour soup

P bouk – dried fermented bean cakes to grill or fry

Thayet chin thohk – fermented green mango salad with onions, green chilli, roasted peanuts, sesame and peanut oil

nga paung thohk

See also

Burmese recipes

References

^ Yin, Saw Myat (2007). Culture Shock!: Myanmar. Singapore: Marshall Cavendish Inc. p. 133. ISBN 9780761454106. 

^ BBC NEWS | Business | Burma cyclone raises rice prices

External links

Burmese breakfast at Mae Sot

Mi Mi Khaing, Cook and Entertain the Burmese Way. Rangoon, 1975

Wikimedia Commons has media related to: Cuisine of Myanmar

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1 Sometimes included in Europe, depending on the border definitions.  2 Officially known as Myanmar.  3 Sometimes included in Oceania, and also known as Timor-Leste.  4 Transcontinental country.  5 Commonly known as Taiwan. 

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